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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 61 (some duplicates have been removed)
for smoking a cigarette. that's why the taliban were not that hard to overthrow in 2001, because the people of afghanistan turned against this barbaric code that the taliban were trying to impose. and this is, you know, in iraq and in afghanistan hardly two of the most liberal, cosmopolitan countries in the world. today i suspect you're seeing much the same thing happen in northern mali where the islamists have tried to impose a very brutal code, and i suspect it's not proving very popular. however, the reason why these groups can have end during appeal is because there's not a good alternative. and the problem that we faced, for example, in afghanistan is that brutal and unpopular as the taliban are, the government has often been worse because the government has not delivered any kind of justice. what the government delivers is a decision that goes to the highest bidder. and so that bad as the taliban y be, they're less corrupt. and you will get a more or less honest judgment out of them which will then be enforced with barbaric severity. that's not the ideal that people want, but it may b
girl who survived being shot in the head by the taliban is speaking clearly and has now released her own video statement. the brave teenager's message to the world, a show of resilience for you this monday next. >>> also last night's battle between the ravens and 49ers set a new record for the longest super bowl ever, thanks in part to this, the blackout during the third quarter. we're going to take a look what may have caused the outage. is it beyonce's fault, jon? that is the big question. the halftime show, did it do it? jon: you know, at least people drank a lot of beer during that 34 minutes. jenna: it apparently helped the television ratings as welcoming across from the "new york times." very interesting. big story for us. we'll get to the bottom of this mystery, hopefully next. jon: new developments in the remarkable recovery of that pakistani teenager who defied the taliban. 15-year-old malala yousufzai was shot in the head last year after she spoke out for the rights of girls to get an education. now she is releasing a video statement speaking clearly about her recovery. jam
a taliban terrorist in california, pay raise. no, freeze for three years. over the last five years one i.c.e. agent killed, one secret service agent killed, three a.t.f. agents killed, one d.e.a. agent killed, two u.s. marshals killed, air traffic controller to put the safety for my family and your family and our constituents as they fly through the sky, the n.i.h. my family has been devastated my cancer. my father died at cancer. my mother died of cancer and it's impacted on my family. dr. collins, who mapped the human genome system that will save many of you and your lives and your sons and daughters because of basically following that system, working on liver cancer, prostate cancer, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, which my mom died off. dr. collins and his team will have been frozen for three years. nasa, we just went through the 10th anniversary of the challenger explosion. those astronauts that sit on that rocket, those and now in the future, if you have a nasa facility in your district and they sit on that rocket to go up, they froze for three years. firefighters out in the west wh
by people that said they would be executed for smoking a cigarette. that's where the taliban were not hard to overthrow in 2001 because the people of afghanistan turned against this code the taliban were trying to impose and this is in iraq and afghanistan hardly the most cosmopolitan countries in the world. today i suspect you see much the same thing happened where they tried to impose a very brutal quote and i suspect it's not proving very popular. however, the reason these groups can have the appeal is because there's not a good alternative, and the problem that we face for example in afghanistan is that brutal and unpopular as they are the government has often been worse because the government hasn't delivered any kind of justice. what the government delivers is a decision that goes to the highest bid so as bad as the taliban maybe they are less corrupt and you won't get a more or less honest judgment out of them that will then be enforced to the barbaric severity. that's not the ideal people want but it may be better than the alternative and so i think the challenge we face in the cou
. >> a schoolgirl and pakistan is being treated after being shot by the taliban and has undergone another to successful operations. she was shot in the head in october as she left school. she was targeted because she campaigned for girls' education. on saturday, doctors reconstructed her skull and fitted in plant into her ear. doctors say they are pleased with her progress. there currently at the country residence of the bridge by mr. following talks on monday trade is the third trilateral summit since last year. the leaders met in july and into the timber. but for the first time, terry and intelligence officials will join them for face-to-face talks as part of an effort to improve cooperation and forestry to withdraw from afghanistan next year. a fire has destroyed almost 100 homes in a shantytown in the capital of bangladesh. everyone appears to have escaped, but it has left more than 500 people homeless. >> the fire started in a shantytown. only a short time later, many homes were destroyed. the fire department says it took an hour to get the flames of a control. residents tried to hel
the international symbol of opposition to the taliban has undergone another round of surgery. great britain's queen elizabeth's hospital says the pair of operations on malala were a success. she was shot in the head by a taliban gunman last october because she advocated education for girls. >>> a former navy s.e.a.l. who was known for his record-setting sniper skills has been shot to death. chris kyle was one of two men killed at a gun range in texas. he served four combat tours in iraq and wrote a best-selling book about his experiences as a sniper after he left the navy in 2009. police arrested a suspect in kyle's death and the second shooting victim, chad littlefield. those are your headlines. "reliable sources" at the top of the hour, but now back to "fareed zakaria gps." >>> only one person in the world who has won a nobel prize, an oscar, a grammy and an emmy. he's not an actor or a singer, he is an environmental activist, a writer, a very successful businessman and he happens to be the former vice president of the united states. i am, of course, speaking of al gore. he has a fascinating new
are more and more effective in powering afghan communities to defend against taliban intimidation and violence. plans are being developed to increase the authorized size of the alp program from 30,000 to 45,000. the next centcom cmander will also play an important role in shaping our enduring partnership with afghanistan after 2014. the partnership that i fully support. ike m. concerned however by the plants to reduce the afghan national security forces by a third starting in 2015. 352,000 to 230,000 by 2017. i believe that any future reductions in the size of the afghan forces should be based on security conditions in afghanistan at that time and this afghan security forces make and providing for their country security, we should reassure them that we will continue to support these efforts by deciding that as we withdraw our forces that the won't get drawdo and afghan forces. progress in afghanistan remains fragile and significant challenges to afghanistan's long-term stability remain. among the greatest threat to its stability are the safe havens for afghan insurgents across the
the taliban among them. >> let me get that. we consider those groups, obviously a threat to the united states. they're the groups that we are in a conflict with, authorized by the authorization for use of military force by the congress and those are the groups against which we run our efforts primarily around, in afghanistan. in south asia, and in other parts of the world. that's the focus of the united states effort because those are the groups that threaten the united states. what president karzai is sayi and we e movi to implement that decisions, in support of this, he is saying that afghans should provide for the core security in afghanistan. that they should be in the lead focused against the insurgency which threatens the afghan government. that's the taliban. >> right. >> and but that's what we're training in supporting and resourcing the afghans to do. and so very importantly, this may, may of 2013, 2013, the mission, the focus of the u.s. forces and the isap forces, the international forces working with the united states will change. and as of may of 2013, these forces, our forces wi
enough after the united states leaves to with stan the taliban and the taliban is able to gain somewhat approaching the power they had previously when they had power, that they would welcome al-qaeda back. >> well, you know, one of the big questions that has not been answered by the president's advisors is what's the american military presence going to be after 2014. in the state of the union, he said we'll be down basically by half a year from now. there are 66,000 now. at the end of the february next year it will be 32,000. but what happens after 2014 when the so-called war is over and there are a whole number of options on the table, anywhere i'd say from 3,000 troops to 10,000 troops or 9,000 troops. and also the capabilities that could be kept in the country from the u.s. side counterterrorism error and all that. so i think what military posture the u.s. agrees to keep in after 2014, and that will effect what nato agrees to do, are the non-u.s. part of nato i think will have a big effect what happens in afghanistan in terms of this question. we should be able to preclude that if th
by the taliban has had major surgery and in the u.k. she was airlifted to britain in october after being targeted for promoting growth and education. doctors worked on reconstructing her skull and restoring hearing. they say she is making good progress. successful projects raise awareness and millions of dollars. it does not necessarily help the cause. >> inside a small london shop, something rather peculiar is going on. and walnuts are meeting their doom and one by one. this is a hard edge of their battle against prostate cancer in the u.k. chris adams has the disease and is the trustee for the charity. >> there has been a significant increase in the awareness of prostate cancer. we have not cracked a walnut and yet, but we are working on it. >> smashing nuts may seem like an odd way to fight the disease, but so is growing a mustache or getting a 69-year-old grammy on board or dressing up in costumes to run yourself to exhaustion. these are always charities have chosen to get themselves notice. it is very business minded, and is working. >> they try to build an identity. they are trying to engag
in powering afghan communities to defend against taliban intimidation and violence. plans are being developed to increase the authorized size of the alp program from 30,000 to 45,000. the next centcom commander will also play an important role in shaping our enduring partnership with afghanistan after 2014. the partnership that i fully support. ike m. concerned however by the plants to reduce the afghan national security forces by a third starting in 2015. 352,000 to 230,000 by 2017. i believe that any future reductions in the size of the afghan forces should be based on security conditions in afghanistan at that time and this afghan security forces make and providing for their country security, we should reassure them that we will continue to support these efforts by deciding that as we withdraw our forces that there won't get drawdown and afghan forces. progress in afghanistan remains fragile and significant challenges to afghanistan's long-term stability remain. among the greatest threat to its stability are the safe havens for afghan insurgents across the pakistan border. the government o
afghan force would help to hedge against any future taliban mischief. you can reasonably expect that an enemy that has been that determined, that agile, will very soon try to test the afghan security forces. that size of a force provides additional capability to allow the political process is too mature a bit. because of that, it seems a larger force would be a benefit. >> thank you. just one question for you, general rodriguez. this has to do with an extremist force that is desirable and other contingency-response forces that would be useful to put the africomm commander in a position to respond to benghazi. if you have not been asked that question, can you tell us whether you would look for ways to find the greater capability to provide contingency response forces beyond what they currently are and were in the case of the benghazi matter? >> yes, sir, i would. i will report back to the committee on that. they have made significant improvements and we have to continue to do that. >> thank you both. we look forward to your confirmation. i want to thank the senator for taking ove
iraq and now 12 years later we're not sure what our mission is. is our mission to eliminate taliban? that never was our mission. is it nation building? um, is it sending children to school? is it building sewer systems? is it going after al-queda? all those factors are complicated, but they have to be carefully thought through. (instrumental music) >> economic interests have always played a significant role in u.s. interventions around the globe. >> i would argue that the strategic interests are more obvious than the economic ones, although if you look closely enough you'll find that the two are almost inextricably intertwined. if you look at all interventions that the united states has engaged in from kosovo, to bosnia, to somalia, uh, to libya, to iraq, for that matter, you will find an economic component. >> maintaining access to certain markets, most often oil, is a common consideration. the u.s. drove iraq out of kuwait in the 1991 gulf war not just to protect its ally from foreign belligerence, but to protect the flourishing oil trade as well. >> i'll give you an example where
was shot in the head by taliban gunmen for speaking out for girl's education rights. in about 15 minutes we are investigating is north korea about to conduct another underground nuclear test? the whole world wants to know what's going on. we get answers. fareed zakaria's "gps" continues right now. >>> there's only one person in the world who has won a nobel prize, an oscar, a grammy and an emmy. he's not an actor or a singer, he is an environmental activist, a writer, a very successful businessman and he happens to be the former vice president of the united states. i am, of course, speaking of al gore. he has a fascinating new book out called "the future six drivers of global change." welcome back. >> thank you. good to be back. >> now, we could talk about everything and we will talk about the book, which is fascinating. but since i have you, so much we could cover. gun control. you and bill clinton passed the first big assault weapon ban. do you believe that that was responsible for your losses in the mid-term election, which has cast a shadow on the democratic party making even today cons
, the taliban and associated forces in response to the 9/11 attacks and we may also use force consistent with our inherent right of national self-defense. there is nothing in international law that bans the use of remotely pilotted aircraft for this purpose or that prohibits us from using lethal force against our enemies outside of an active battlefield at least when the country involved con cents or is unwilling to take action against a threat. second, targeted strikes are ethical. without question, the ability to target a specific individual from hundreds or thousands of miles away raises profound questions. here, i think it is useful to consider such strikes against the basic principle of the law of war that govern the use of force. targeted strikes conform to the principle of necessity. requirement that the target has definite military value. in this armed conflict, individuals who are part of al qaeda or its associated forces are legitimate military targets. we have the authority to target them with lethal force, just as we target enemy leaders in past conflicts such as them and the
. we went because it met our goal to give it about qaeda. we have been in the taliban government and set the country sorted into free play, we develop some kind of moral responsibility for helping them get it right. third, geostrategic plates in america in the world's interest to have a stable region. if afghanistan were unstable, acting pakistan's stability would be very tenuous and it challenges anyway, but i think it's important. my view is that we need to do is be persistent and consistent in the region. the reason people are so nervous is because in 2004 the inc. were going to leave and they seemed asleep before. in 1989 returned from the region. it doesn't matter whether each afghan style that appeared its become a commonly accepted truth that we left in 1989 and they're starting to think we're going to walk in 2014 and there will be nobody they can rely on. they'll have other strategic allies. so what they looking for is the idea of a long-term strategic partnership. i don't think that the specific number of troops. i think it's the idea you got an ally somewhere in their
out of her hands. but in pakistan the government is still providing shelter for the taliban. and there's still no real solid ra approachment between us and then. so it is very hard to see that her soothing, her repairing of applianc appliance-- alliances necessarily resulted in concrete policy achievements. >> suarez: susan, wasn't it a pretty complicated mess, not only where places as trudy knows, like pakistan, but even with some of america's closest allies. >> well, that's exactly right. i mean these are times where, you know, you play the hand you are dealt as secretary of state not only because the white house decides the big picture policy. but the world over the last four years has been a complicated place who would have expected that actually europe our closee-- closest allies would have been in a period of enormous internal turmoil greater than anything they have seen since the end of world war 2. so clinton was left to manage those relationships. i think i would say that she was often a soother, but often as not she was also someone who would speak out in a tough manner. look
not for afghans. they didn't invite in 2001. it meant our goal to get rid of al qaeda. when we upped the taliban government and set the country in to free play, i think we developed a responsibility for helping them set it right. third, i think in america and the world's interest to have a stability region. if afghanistan were to be completely unstable, i think pakistan's stability would be very tenuous. and they have challenges anyway. i think it's important. so my view what we need to do is be consistent and persistent in the region. the reason people in afghanistan are nervous because in 2004, they think we're going leave and they have seen us leave before. in 1989 we turned from the region. it doesn't matter which each individual afghan saw that. it's become commonly accepted truth we left in 19 the 9 ab and they're walk in 2014. and they'll be nobody they can rely on. they don't have other strategic allies. what they're looking for, in my view, the idea of a long-term strategic partnership. i don't think that's a specific number of troops in a specific amount of money. ink it's the idea you
the government is still providing shelter for the taliban. and there's still no real solid ra approachment between us and then. so it is very hard to see that her soothing her repairing of appliance appliance-- alliances necessarily resulted in concrete policy achievements. >> suarez: susan wasn't it a pretty complicated mess not only where places as trudy knows like pakistan but even with some of america's closest allies. >> well, that's exactly right. i mean these are times where you know, you play the hand you are dealt as secretary of state not only because the white house decides the big picture policy. but the world over the last four years has been a complicated place who would have expected that actually europe our closee-- closest allies would have been in a period of enormous internal turmoil greater than anything they have seen since the end of world war 2. so clinton was left to manage those relationships. i think i would say that she was often a soother but often as not she was also someone who would speak out in a tough manner. look at her championship with the russians. even
of the president. i support him. we cannot change the equation at this point in time. the taliban have been determined to relentlessly attacked the afghan government. we have to not pull out and make sure we focus on a counterterrorism strategy compared to the surge strategy, which did not accomplish its goal. host: another word that was not mentioned was the use of drones in the confirmation hearing. guest: this is a controversial subject. i fall on the side of supporting our drone program relentlessly sorting our drone program to protect our troops and to prevent the united states from being harmed by terrorists. when al qaeda operatives were taken out by drones >>> in afghanistan and yemen -- by drone strikes in afghanistan and elsewhere, i commended the president for his counterterrorism policy. it has protected the homeland as best as any weapon we could have. it has been an effective way of putting al qaeda on the defense and keeping them on the run. the president deserves congratulations for being relentlessly consistent and persistent in his drone program. does that mean it has been
it said local taliban was working with warlords to provide guards and weapons for the use of the contract. it came out that they were failing to adequately investigate the previous employment which resulted in the company's hiring individuals who previously had been fired for sharing sensitive information. security information with the taliban war lords and failure to appropriately some of according to the u.s. intelligence reports may have been involved in anti-american activity. all of that information was out in a classified we several weeks before it to attend comes out of 28 and was out in public of september 28th. guess who the state department gave the contract to for guarding them on the 29th. the eodt and then the were fired for never performing because they couldn't perform accurately. they wanted to litigate. meanwhile guess who is still guarding. we had egis guarding which was another contract of kabul. we still have armored troops then we did a contract with the jet. they finally took over the summer. i urge you all to take a look and you do not have to come secretary, you ca
. it was to liberate because the plan was overthrow saddam, get out of there, just like we overthrew the taliban in afghanistan and god as they are and of course afghanistan fell apart and we had to go through that. we are facing an insurgency. we don't know what to do. all the officers there hadn't been trained to fight this sort of war. the listening manuals. they did what they usually do, banged on doors and arrest and kill people and anyone who had read kahlÚa or naco what now is counterproductive because you end up killing the wrong people. he off their cousins and brothers who may become insurgents, too. so petraeus in mozilla decides to put into effect the ideas he's learned. so he and his guys, they start setting up an election for the new district council. they said at the elections. they bring in field trip from turkey. they get communications systems going. they get iraqis to open up newspapers. he opens at the border to syria along northern iraq. he does all this on his own. he's not touring with coronation of anybody, washington or baghdad or any place that works for a while and th
by the taliban. how is hou she is doing following a pair of complicated surgeries. >> chasing at the american dream. are today's teenagers less optimistic than their parents? the answer may surprise you. >> and new details around a deadly terror attack in benghazi. what leon panetta is revealing before leaving his post for good. >> if we are invited we'll have the opportunity to testify. we look forward to it. ♪ you know my heart burns for you... ♪ i'm up next, but now i'm sging the heartburn blues. hold on, prilosec isn't for fast relief. cue up alka-seltzer. it stops heartburn fast. ♪ oh what a relief it is! cue up alka-seltzer. it stops heartburn fast. i have obligations. cute tobligations, but obligations.g. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider i
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 61 (some duplicates have been removed)